Contributors

F.J. Bergmann has manifested in Analog, Asimov’s, Apex and elsewhere in the alphabet, and functions, so to speak, as editor of Star*Line, the journal of the Science Fiction and Fantasy Poetry Association, until August 2017, poetry editor of Mobius: The Journal of Social Change and other literary roles. A Catalogue of the Further Suns (dystopian first-contact poems), won the 2017 Gold Line Press chapbook contest. Order a signed or inscribed copy at fibitz.com/sales.html. (RwA 1.1, RwA 1.2)

One of Bergmann’s colossal tentacles (which ends in a barbed hook)
can reach all the way from the bedroom to the refrigerator. Includes stairs.
In the past few months, F.J. Bergmann manually sifted approximately a million tons
of former gravel-and-clay parking lot to put in raised garden beds
in the front of her new apartment. Fortunately, Fred does full-body massages.

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Allen Braden is the author of A Wreath of Down and Drops of Blood and Elegy in the Passive Voice.  He has received fellowships from the NEA and Artist Trust.  His poems recently appeared in The World Is Charged: Poetic Engagements with Gerard Manley Hopkins.  He is the assistant poetry editor of Terrain.org: A Journal of the Built + Natural Environments. (RwA 1.2)

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Deborah L. Davitt was raised in Reno, Nevada, but received her MA in English from Penn State. She currently lives in Houston, Texas, with her husband and son.  Her poetry has garnered two Rhysling nominations and has appeared in nearly twenty journals; her short fiction has appeared in InterGalactic Medicine Show, Compelling Science Fiction, Altered Europa, Silver Blade, and The Fantasist. Her well-received Edda-Earth series is available through Amazon. For more about her work, please see www.edda-earth.com. (RwA 1.2)

When all else fails, strive for clarity–of writing, of ideas, of understanding.

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Matt Dennison: After a rather extended and varied second childhood in New Orleans, Matt Dennison’s work has appeared in Rattle, Bayou Magazine, Redivider, Natural Bridge, The Spoon River Poetry Review and Cider Press Review, among others. He has also made short films with Michael Dickes, Swoon, and Marie Craven. (RwA 1.1)

Dennison’s “The Pump” first appeared in Concho River Review (2013).
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Troy Farah is a journalist and photographer from Phoenix, Arizona. His work has appeared in VICE, LA Weekly, Spillers #3, Every Day Fiction, LitReactor and others. His website is troyfarah.com (RwA 1.2)

Troy is fascinated by insects and microcosms, an avid medical marijuana enthusiast
and still shoots film photography for some reason.

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D.G. “Greg” Geis is the author of “Fire Sale” (Tupelo Press/Leapfolio) and “Mockumentary” Main Street Rag). Most recently, his poetry has appeared in Fjords, Skylight 47 (Ireland), A New Ulster Review (Ireland), Crannog Magazine (Ireland), The Moth, (Ireland), Into the Void (Ireland), The Naugatuck River Review, The Tishman Review, Zoomorphic (U.K.), The Kentucky Review, Ink and Letters, The Worcester Review, Broad River Review, and Under the Radar (Nine Arches Press UK). He was shortlisted for both the 2016 Percy French Prize (Strokestown International Poetry Festival, Ireland) and 2016 The Ballymaloe International Poetry Prize, Ireland. He lives in Houston, Texas. (RwA 1.1)

Greg has a voracious appetite for tabloids, television, and true crime.
Something his poet friends find appalling. He think this is an understandable reaction
to having 2 graduate degrees in philosophy. After all,
why invent a world when the one we live in is so damn strange?

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John Guzlowski’s poetry, essays, and fiction appears in Garrison Keillor’s Writer’s AlmanacNorth American ReviewSalon.ComRattleNimrod, and many other print and online journals here and abroad.  His writing about his parents’ experiences as slave laborers in Nazi Germany and refugees in America appears in his memoir in prose and poetry, Echoes of Tattered Tongues (Aquila Polonica Press). The book received the 2017 Ben Franklin Award for Poetry and the Eric Hoffer Montaigne Medal for most thought provoking book.  Of Guzlowski’s writing, Nobel Laureate Czeslaw Milosz said, “He has an astonishing ability for grasping reality.” (RwA 1.2)

Reading Love Song of J. Alfred Prufrock

When I first read it I was 
Young, eighteen, a student
Too young to know what 
Really feeds us, I laughed 

And said to my friend Mike 
Rychlewski, “And they call 
This oatmeal poetry? They 
Should feed it to the cows.” 

Guzlowski “The Love Song of T. S. Eliot: A Sonnet” first appeared in Mayday (Fall 2013)
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Juleigh Howard-Hobson’s poetry has appeared in The Lyric, VerseWisconsin, The Alabama Literary Review, Autumn Sky Poetry, Consequence Journal, Able Muse, Mandragora (Scarlet Imprint), Poem, Revised (Marion Street Press) and many other places.  Her work has been nominated for “The Best of the Net” and The Pushcart Prize (twice on the Pushcart so far). Her latest book is Remind Me (Ancient Cypress Press). A post-modern drop out, she now lives on a farm, nestled besides a dark forest, in Deep Cascadia. More about her and her formal poetics here. (RwA 1.2)

Juleigh Howard-Hobson was originally left-handed, but was trained in school to use
her non-dominant one…this likely has something or other to do with her attitude
toward rules in general. Or maybe not.
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Liam Hogan is a London based writer. Winner of Quantum Shorts 2015 and Sci-Fest LA’s Roswell Award 2016, his dark fantasy collection, Happy Ending Not Guaranteed, is out in April 2017, from Arachne Press. Visit him at happyendingnotguaranteed.blogspot.co.uk, or tweet at @LiamJHogan. (RwA 1.1)

Liam Hogan was abandoned in a library at the tender age of 3,
only to emerge blinking into the sunlight many years later, with a head full of words
and an aversion to loud noises. He lives in London and dreams in Dewey Decimals.

Hogan’s “Labyrinth” first appeared in Ex Fic (April 2014)

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C.L. Holland is a British writer of speculative fiction. She has a BA in English with Creative Writing, and MA in English, and likes to learn things for fun. She lives with her partner, and two cats who don’t understand why they can’t share her lap with the laptop. Her website can be found at clholland.weebly.com. (RwA 1.1)

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Akua Lezli Hope is a creator who uses sound, words, fiber, glass, and metal to create poems, patterns, stories, music, ornaments, adornments and peace whenever possible. She has won fellowships from the New York Foundation for the Arts, Ragdale, and The National Endowment for The Arts, among other awards.  She is a Cave Canem fellow.  She won the 2015 Science Fiction Poetry Association’s short poem award.  She has published 115 crochet designs. A paraplegic, she’s started a paratransit nonprofit so that she can get around her country town. http://www.akualezlihope.com (RwA 1.2)

Akua Lezli Hope’s fiber love ranges from planting to end product.
She makes paper from scratch creating figured paper and vessels.
An avid crochet designer (over 150 designs), she also digs
weaving with sticks, which finds its expression in masks.
She sings a lot, owns a tenor and alto sax,
piano, guitar and over 2500 records.
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Alexander James lives in West London with his wife. He is an amateur writer of poetry and short stories in English and Chinese, with work featured in Rattle and After the Pause among others. You can find his Chinese-language work at facebook.com/grasshopperpoetry (RwA 1.1)

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Siham Karami lives in Florida and co-owns a technology recycling company. Her poetry and critical work have been published in such places as The Comstock Review, Tupelo Quarterly, Able Muse, Think, Unsplendid, Sukoon, thethepoetry, The Turnip Truck(s), and The Rumpus. A three-time Pushcart and twice  Best of the Net nominee, she blogs at sihamkarami.wordpress.com.  (RwA 1.2)

Siham can compose and memorize poems (and songs, music and lyrics) in her head,
after finding herself frequently unable to write them down at the moment of inspiration.
She is moved to tears by fireworks displays and meteor showers.
The name Siham means “arrow” in Arabic, which is also sometimes her nickname,
another reason to love being Riddled with them.

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Herb Kauderer is a retired Teamster who somehow grew up to become an associate professor of English at Hilbert College.  This life shift was enabled by too many college degrees and too many poetry publications.  His work has appeared in Asimov’sAnalogGrievous AngelBlood Sweat & TearsGnarled Oak, and many more places.  Flying Solo: The Lana Invasion is his eleventh book of poetry, out recently from Poet’s Haven Press.  More about his writing can be found at HerbKauderer.com.  (RwA 1.2)

Herb has forgotten how to play the drums.

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Ahmed A. Khan is a Canadian writer, originally hailing from India. His works have appeared in various venues including Interzone, Strange Horizons, Anotherealm, Murderous Intent, and Plan-B. Some of his stories have been translated and published in Finnish, German, Greek and Croatian publications. He has also edited/co-edited anthologies including SF Waxes Philosophical, A Mosque Among the Stars and Dandelions on Mars. His facebook page is at: https://www.facebook.com/ahmedkhanwrites/. (RwA 1.2)

The only unusual thing Ahmed can think of about himself
is that he doesn’t find anything unusual about himself.

Khan’s “Point, Counter Point” first appeared in Sparks (October 2008)

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Anastasia Kirke is a scribbler, traveler, and literary omnivore currently residing on a sun-washed rock in the middle of a warm sea. She has acted as writer and editor for various grassroots literary initiatives including Stejjer Imfewħa, Schlock Magazine, and the Juniper Bends Reading Series. You can stalk her on anastasiakirke.wordpress.com (RwA 1.1)

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E.E. King is a performer, writer, biologist and painter. Her books are; Dirk Quigby’s Guide to the Afterlife, (“Impish and delightful, a hilarious Zagat’s guide to heaven!” Ray Bradbury “A fantastical, profound, hilarious and rollicking good ride through the heavens and hells of the Afterlife! A wonderful book.” —Margaret Cho) and Another Happy Ending.  She has worked with children in Bosnia, crocodiles in Mexico, frogs in Puerto Rico, egrets in Bali, mushrooms in Montana, archaeologists in Spain, butterflies in South Central Los Angeles and lectured on island evolution and marine biology on cruise ships in the South Pacific and Caribbean—in short, anything that won’t pay the bills. Check out paintings writing and musings at www.elizabetheveking.com(RwA 1.1, RwA 1.2)

King has raises egrets and other birds and beasts—they rarely bite
the hand that feeds them, and unlike people, lack teeth.

King’s “How Novels Grow” first appeared in Grievous Angel  (2015)

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Kim Peter Kovac works nationally and internationally in theater for young audiences with an emphasis on new play development and networking.  He tells stories on stages as producer of new plays, and tells stories in writing with lineated poems, prose poems, creative non-fiction, flash fiction, haiku, haibun, and microfiction, with work appearing or forthcoming in print and on-line in journals from Australia, India, Dubai (UAE), England, Scotland, South Africa, and the USA  including The Journal of Compressed Creative Arts, Red Paint Hill, Elsewhere, Frogpond, Mudlark, and Counterexample Poeticskimpeterkovac.tumblr.com (RwA 1.1)

Kim’s been fortunate enough to have traveled internationally,
and has written pieces set in Amsterdam; Baku, Azerbaijan; Beijing; Berlin;
Bratislava, Slovakia: Robben Island,
South Africa; Tokyo; Vienna; Wadi Rum, Jordan; Warsaw.

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Sandra J. Lindow has been publishing her poetry for over 56 years.  Her first poem was published when she was 11.  She has seven books of poetry and 23 Rhysling nominations. Presently she is Vice President of the SFPA. (RwA 1.1, RwA 1.2)

Sandra Lindow learned flower gardening from her grandmother,
a very wise woman who nevertheless neglected to tell Sandra that peonies
required ants to bloom. At first Sandra tried to rid her own peonies of the unsightly ants
until a gardening book revealed the unsettling commensal truth.

Lindow’s “How to Write Your Own Peony” (RwA #1) first appeared in An Ariel Anthology: transformational poetry & art (November 2014)

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Lisa Lutwyche received an MFA in Creative Writing from Goddard College (Vermont). Poet, artist, produced playwright, and actor, she has been published across the US and the UK. She has been twice nominated for a Pushcart Prize. Lisa’s full-length book of poetry, A Difficult Animal, was Published by Saddle Road Press in 2016. Lisa’s background includes a BFA in painting, a BA in art history, and 22 years in architecture. She has taught creative writing at arts centers, retreats, and libraries since 1992, and art and theatre to special needs adults. Lisa is an adjunct Assistant Professor of English at Cecil College in Maryland. (RwA 1.2)

Lisa grew up in a house of Music. Her mother’s piano and her father’s cello
were probably the first things she ever heard. She grew up backstage
behind symphony orchestras, with musicians and conductors from all over the world.
Lisa hears music in her head, constantly,in multi-part harmonies.

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Charlotte Mandel‘s tenth book of poetry, To Be the Daylight, is forthcoming from White Violet Press, imprint of Kelsay Books. Previous titles include Through a Garden Gate, photographs by Vincent Covello, (David Robert Books), and two poem-novellas of feminist biblical revision—The Life of Mary and The Marriages of Jacob. Awards include the New Jersey Poets Prize and two fellowships in poetry from New Jersey State Council on the Arts. She edited the Eileen W. Barnes Award Anthology, Saturday’s Women. Critical essays include articles on the role of cinema in the life and work of H.D. Visit her at www.charlottemandel.com. (RwA 1.2)

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John C. Mannone has work in Blue Fifth Review, Peacock Journal, Gyroscope Review, New England Journal of Medicine, Baltimore Review, Pedestal, and Pirene’s Fountain. He’s the recipient of the prestigious Jean Ritchie Fellowship (2017) for Appalachian literature. Other accomplishments: two Weymouth residencies; three poetry collections [2017 Elgin-nominated Apocalypse (Alban Lake Publishing), Disabled Monsters (Linnet’s Wings Press) featured at the 2016 Southern Festival of Books, Flux Lines (Celtic Cat Publishing)]; the Joy Margrave Award in creative nonfiction (2015, 2017); 2016 Event Horizon finalist; Pushcart and Rhysling nominations. He edits poetry for Abyss & Apex, Silver Blade, and Liquid Imagination. http://jcmannone.wordpress.com. (RwA 1.2)

Despite his MS degrees in physical/theoretical chemistry and in physics;
a PhD (candidacy) in Electrical Engineering; and experience as a research scientist,
consultant to the nuclear industry, and physics professor,
John’s right-brain came out of comatose when poetry discovered him
in May 2004.  He lives between Knoxville and Chattanooga, TN
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Ross McCleary is from Edinburgh, Scotland. He is an editor of podcast journal Lies, Dreaming; an organiser for spoken word night Inky Fingers; and had a novella published by Maudlin House in 2016. Recently he has been published by Constellations, Five2One, and is forthcoming in Pushing Out the Boat. He can be found on twitter @strongmisgiving. (RwA 1.1)

Ross was born 9 months after Jorge Luis Borges passed away.

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Jennifer Stewart Miller’s poetry has appeared in Cider Press Review, Harpur Palate, Hayden’s Ferry Review, Jabberwock Review, Poet Lore, Sycamore Review, and other journals. She’s a Pushcart nominee and lives in New York. For more information visit jenniferstewartmiller.com. (RwA 1.2)
 
In previous lives, Jennifer has fought fires for the U.S. Forest Service,
practiced law, dated clay tobacco pipes from archaeological digs,
and served as a court-appointed special advocate for a boy in foster care.

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Michelle Muenzler, known at local science fiction and fantasy conventions as “The Cookie Lady”, writes fiction both dark and strange to counterbalance the sweetness of her baking. Her short fiction and poetry can be read in numerous science fiction and fantasy magazines, and she takes immense joy in crinkling words like little foil puppets. Find links to more of her work at michellemuenzler.com, or pick up her bleakly disturbing and blackly humorous novella, The Hills of Meat, the Forest of Bone, at your favorite online retailer. (RwA 1.1)

Muenzler’s “This is the Story That Devours Itself” first appeared in Daily Science Fiction (March 2015)

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Gregory L. Norris writes full-time from the outer limits of New Hampshire’s North Country. His career has been chronicled on TV, radio, and in numerous online interviews. Follow his literary adventures on Facebook and at gregorylnorris.blogspot.com. (RwA 1.1)

Norris loves coffee, cats, and his emerald-eyed muse.
Writing, he often emotes, is the heart that beats inside his heart.

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Toti O’Brien’s mixed media have been exhibited in group and solo shows, in Europe and the US. She has illustrated two children books and two memoirs. Her artwork has appeared in Nonbinary Review, Adanna, Star 82, and Brain of Forgetting, among other journals and magazines. (RwA 1.1)

Toti is known as the Italian accordionist with the Irish last name—also famous for
owning a monster grapefruit tree, never wearing a pair of socks in her life, and
climbing all the way to the top of Mount Boldy in a pair of worn out ballerina shoes.

O’Brien’s “Malamormiononmuore, 1” can also be found on her website, totihan.net/artist.html.

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Christa Pandey is an Austin poet, whose work has appeared in numerous journals and anthologies. The wedding garland analogy stems from the Indian side of her family (husband’s), while she herself migrated from Europe. She has published three chapbooks, Southern Seasons, Maya, and Hummingbird Wings. (RwA 1.2)

Much of Christa’s life has been spent juggling three cultures:
that of her birth (German), that of her marriage (Indian) and that
of the United States where she has lived for half a century. Christa and her spouse
just completed 50 years of an intercultural, interracial, interfaith marriage.

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Alan Perry is a retired Human Resources executive with a B.A. in English from the University of Minnesota. His poems have won awards from the League of Minnesota Poets and Arizona State Poetry Society, and have appeared or are forthcoming in Talking Stick, Sleet Magazine, Gyroscope Review, Muddy River Poetry Review, Gnarled Oak, and elsewhere. (RwA 1.2)

Alan is a native Minnesotan who said he would someday avoid
the near-death winter freezings in his home state.
In retirement, he and his wife now spend winters in Tucson, Arizona,
where the University of Arizona Poetry Center, combined with
the Loft Literary Center in Minneapolis,
feel like the mother lodes of poetry immersion year-round.

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Bethany Powell’s first published fantasy poem was inspired by being a spinner of literal yarn. She works as a coach to creators, building up their physical and emotional health in order to continue their work. She does her part for weirdness in rural Oklahoma, which inspires much of her poetry. Read more of her work at bethanypowell.com(RwA 1.1)

Bethany is working on her Korean script, to add to Japanese and English.
If she master writing systems in more languages, she wonders
if she can transmute into a megapoet?

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Jenn Powers is a writer and photographer from New England.  She is currently writing a CNF memoir and her most recent work is published or forthcoming in Hayden’s Ferry Review, Jabberwock Review, The Pinch, Gulf Stream Lit Mag, and Raven Chronicles, among others.  Please visit www.jennpowers.com. (RwA 1.2)

Jenn loves adventure and has a permanent case of wanderlust. She climbs mountains
and hikes forests.  Her last epic trip was a solo cross country exploration
spanning five weeks, almost 8,000 miles, and 21 states. 
The best part was being alone.

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Wendy Rathbone has had over 500 poems published in venues such as: Asimov’s, Apex, Pedestal, Dreams & Nightmares, Mythic Delirium, and upcoming in Star*Line, Silver Blade and more. Her most recent poetry book, Dead Starships, is available on Amazon, as is her current Elgin Award nominated book, Turn Left at November. Two of her poems were recently nominated for the Rhysling Award. She lives in Yucca Valley, CA. (RwA 1.1)

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Karen Slikker is an emerging poet, as well as artist and theatrical director. She recently completed a writer’s residency at Salmon Poetry and Literary Center in Ireland. She is a member of the Chattanooga Writers’ Guild.​ (RwA 1.2)

Karen fell in love with words at an early age and never recovered. She is regularly razzed
by family and friends regarding her vocabulary. “Honestly, I am NOT showing off.
I just dearly love finding the exact right word for what I want to say!”​

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Sarah Brown Weitzman has been published in hundreds of journals and anthologies including Rosebud, The New Ohio Review, Poet & Critic, The North American Review, Rattle, Mid-American Review, The MacGuffin,  Poet Lore, Spillway, etc.  Sarah received a Fellowship from the National Endowment for the Arts. (RwA 1.1)

Sarah was born in 1935 and remembers seeing during the forties Rube Goldberg drawings
in the Sunday newspaper on the same page as “The Funnies.”  Only recently did she see
the relationship between his connections and the forming of a poem.

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Terry Wright is a writer and artist who lives in Little Rock, Arkansas.   His art has been featured widely in venues, including Queen Mob’s Tea House, Potion, Sliver of Stone, The Jet Fuel Review, Third Wednesday, and USA Today.  Exhibitions include the 57th Annual Delta Exhibition.  More art available at cruelanimal.com. (RwA 1.1)

Terry’s sunrise can beat up yours.

Wright’s “The Nag of Literature” can also be found on his blog, “Blog with a View”.

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Jane Yolen, “the Hans Christian Andersen of America,” is the author of 366 books  including Owl Moon, The Devil’s Arithmetic, and How Do Dinosaurs Say Goodnight Her books, stories, poems have won an assortment of awards–two Nebulas, a World Fantasy Award, a Caldecott Medal, three Golden Kite awards, three Mythopoeic awards, two Christopher Medals, a nomination for the National Book Award, and the Jewish Book Award, among many others. She’s the  first writer in the Connecticut River Valley to win the New England Public Radio’s Arts and Humanities Award. Six colleges and universities have given her honorary doctorates. www.janeyolen.com (RwA 1.2)

From Jane: “My friend Betsy’s mom loved my book Owl Moon so much,
she had Betsy reread it to her as she lay dying. I can think
of no greater honor for a writer than a woman of character and courage
asking for something I wrote to send her on
her final journey. My hands shook as I wrote this poem.
It’s the first of two–this when she rallied
the other written weeks later after her death, both of which
Betsy plans to read at the memorial service.
Another way writing holds us together.


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Tyler Young is a Midwestern lawyer by day, fiction writer by night. His stories have appeared in Daily Science Fiction and Nature and are forthcoming in Gamut and the Sunvault Anthology. When he isn’t writing, he is usually at a zoo or museum with his wife and two children. Follow him @Tyler_A_Young. (RwA 1.1)

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Amanda Yskamp’s work has been published in such magazines as Threepenny Review, Hayden’s Ferry Review, The Georgia Review, Boxcar Review, Rattapallax, and Caketrain.   She lives on the 10-year flood plain of the Russian River, where she teaches writing from her online classroom. (RwA 1.2)

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Andrena Zawinski’s latest collection, Landings, is forthcoming from Kelsay Books in June 2017. Zawinski has published two previous full collections of poetry: Something About (Blue Light Press, San Francisco, CA), a PEN Oakland Josephine Miles Award recipient, and Traveling in Reflected Light (Pig Iron Press, Youngstown, O), a Kenneth Patchen competition winner. She has also authored four chapbooks. Zawinski runs the San Francisco Bay Area Women’s Poetry Salon and is Features Editor at Poetry Magazine. Her poetry has won awards for free verse, form, spirituality, and social concern. andrenazawinski.wordpress.com (RwA 1.1)

Andrena Zawinski is a poet who sometimes dabbles in flash fiction,
a feminist activist andlong time educator, as well as an avid shutterbug.
She was born and raised Pittsburgh, PAbut lives on the city island of Alameda, CA
on a flyway where she delights in all the birds that wing by.

Zawinski’s “Writing Lessons” first appeared in Paterson Literary Review 32,
and was an Allen Ginsberg Honors recipient (2002)

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Jim Zola has worked in a warehouse, as a security guard, in a bookstore, as a teacher for Deaf children, as a toy designer for Fisher Price, and currently as a children’s librarian. Published in many journals through the years, his publications include a chapbook — The One Hundred Bones of Weather (Blue Pitcher Press) — and a full length poetry collection — What Glorious Possibilities (Aldrich Press). He currently lives in Greensboro, NC (RwA 1.1)